by alienspacecentereast
January 18, 2010

from YouTube Website

 


Haiti Earthquake & the HAARP (High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program) Induction Magnetometer

You will now see 3 images based on a time-frequency spectrogram, which shows the frequency content of signals recorded by the HAARP Induction Magnetometer.

 

This instrument, provided by the University of Tokyo, measures temporal variations in the geomagnetic field in the ULF (ultra-low frequency) range of 0-5 Hz. The spectrogram images are produced by computing the PSD (power spectral density) of successive 102.4-second segments of time-series data, and plotting these spectra as color/intensity slices along a 24-hour scale.

 

Audio files are created by converting the raw 10 Hz sampled waveform (Bx channel) to a wav file at 44.1 kHz (resulting in a playback speedup of 4410 times), and then compressing the 1.7MB wav file to a 150KB mp3 file.
 


HAARP Induction Magnetometer
It is a time-frequency spectrogram, which shows the frequency content of signals recorded by the HAARP Induction Magnetometer. This instrument, provided by the University of Tokyo, measures temporal variations in the geomagnetic field in the ULF (ultra-low frequency) range of 0-5 Hz.

 

The spectrogram images are produced by computing the PSD (power spectral density) of successive 102.4-second segments of time-series data, and plotting these spectra as color/intensity slices along a 24-hour scale.

The 2010 Haiti earthquake was a catastrophic magnitude 7.0 Mw earthquake.

 

Its epicenter was near Logne, approximately 25 km (16 miles) west of Port-au-Prince, the capital of Haiti. The earthquake occurred at 16:53:10 local time (21:53:10 UTC) on Tuesday, 12 January 2010, at a depth of 13 km (8.1 miles).

 

The United States Geological Survey recorded a series of at least 33 aftershocks, fourteen of them between magnitudes 5.0 and 5.9.