by Dr. Edward F.

Group III, DC, ND, DACBN, DABFM
December 3, 2012

from GlobalHealingCenter Website

Spanish version
 

 

 

 

 

 


Cilantro

If there is one herb with fantastic flavor offering, it is cilantro (also named coriander). Nothing opens up the flavor in black bean tacos quite the same way.

 

Cilantro isnít a recent addition to our lexicon and its uses extend well beyond culinary delight. Ancient Greece used cilantro essential oil as a component of perfume. During medieval times, the Romans used cilantro to mask the smell of rotten meat.

 

Today, itís still used by naturopaths and has been the subject of many positive inquiries by formal research institutions.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Toxic Metal Cleansing

Cilantro is most often cited as being effective for toxic metal cleansing and rightfully so, this herb is a powerful, natural cleansing agent.

 

The chemical compounds in cilantro bind to toxic metals and loosen them from the tissue. Many people suffering from mercury exposure report a reduction in the often-cited feeling of disorientation after consuming large and regular amounts of cilantro over an extended period.
 

 

 


Other Benefits of Cilantro

  • May be able to help prevent cardiovascular damage. [1]

  • The School of Life Science in Tamil Nadu, India noted, after researching the anti diabetic activity of cilantro, the leaves and stem, "if used in cuisine would be a remedy for diabetes." [2]

  • Strong antioxidant activity. [3]

  • Has been shown to have anti-anxiety effects. [4]

  • May help improve sleep quality. [5]

  • Has been examined and described to have a blood-sugar lowering effect. [6]

  • Cilantro seed oil possess antioxidative and antihyperglycemic properties, consumption may decrease oxidative stress. [7]

  • Research conducted by The Dental School of Piracicaba in Brazil found cilantro oil to be a new natural antifungal formulation opportunity. [8]

  • Demonstrated activity against several types of harmful organisms. [9] [10]

NOTE: James A. Duke, Ph.D., a former botanist at the U.S. Department of Agriculture, and author of The CRC Handbook of Medicinal Herbs, has praised the digestive-system-promoting benefits of cilantro and recommends drinking a cup of the tea made from a handful of the leaves, when experiencing any form of stomach discomfort.

 

 

 

Grow Your Own

If you have not ventured into growing your own food, an herb garden is a fantastic project to begin with.

 

Herbs are easy to grow, donít need a lot of space. Plus, thatís a great category to save a few bucks at the grocery store on. Organic herb bunches are always at least a few dollars and sometimes large portions can go unused.

 

Cilantro is really easy to grow and itís ultra convenient to have your own organic plant growing for your use.

 


 

References

  1. Omura Y, Beckman SL. Role of mercury (Hg) in resistant infections & effective treatment of Chlamydia trachomatis and Herpes family viral infections (and potential treatment for cancer) by removing localized Hg deposits with Chinese parsley and delivering effective antibiotics using various drug uptake enhancement methods. Acupunct Electrother Res. 1995 Aug-Dec;20(3-4):195-229.

  2. Patel DK, Desai SN, Gandhi HP, Devkar RV, Ramachandran AV. Cardio protective effect of Coriandrum sativum L. on isoproterenol induced myocardial necrosis in rats. Food Chem Toxicol. 2012 Sep;50(9):3120-5. doi: 10.1016/j.fct.2012.06.033.

  3. Sreelatha S, Inbavalli R. Antioxidant, antihyperglycemic, and antihyperlipidemic effects of Coriandrum sativum leaf and stem in alloxan-induced diabetic rats. J Food Sci. 2012 Jul;77(7):T119-23. doi: 10.1111/j.1750-3841.2012.02755.x. Epub 2012 Jun 1.

  4. Park G, Kim HG, Kim YO, Park SH, Kim SY, Oh MS. Coriandrum sativum L. protects human keratinocytes from oxidative stress by regulating oxidative defense systems. Skin Pharmacol Physiol. 2012;25(2):93-9. doi: 10.1159/000335257. Epub 2012 Feb 1.

  5. Mahendra P, Bisht S. Anti-anxiety activity of Coriandrum sativum assessed using different experimental anxiety models. Indian J Pharmacol. 2011 Sep;43(5):574-7. doi: 10.4103/0253-7613.84975.

  6. Rakhshandeh H, Sadeghnia HR, Ghorbani A. Sleep-prolonging effect of Coriandrum sativum hydro-alcoholic extract in mice. Nat Prod Res. 2012;26(22):2095-8. doi: 10.1080/14786419.2011.613388. Epub 2011 Oct 12.

  7. Aissaoui A, Zizi S, Israili ZH, Lyoussi B. Hypoglycemic and hypolipidemic effects of Coriandrum sativum L. in Meriones shawi rats. J Ethnopharmacol. 2011 Sep 1;137(1):652-61. doi: 10.1016/j.jep.2011.06.019. Epub 2011 Jun 28.

  8. Deepa B, Anuradha CV. Antioxidant potential of Coriandrum sativum L. seed extract. Indian J Exp Biol. 2011 Jan;49(1):30-8.

  9. Furletti VF, Teixeira IP, Obando-Pereda G, Mardegan RC, Sartoratto A, Figueira GM, Duarte RM, Rehder VL, Duarte MC, HŲfling JF. Action of Coriandrum sativum L. Essential Oil upon Oral Candida albicans Biofilm Formation. Evid Based Complement Alternat Med. 2011;2011:985832. doi: 10.1155/2011/985832. Epub 2011 May 21.

  10. Lixandru BE, Drăcea NO, Dragomirescu CC, Drăgulescu EC, Coldea IL, Anton L, Dobre E, Rovinaru C, Codiţă I. Antimicrobial activity of plant essential oils against bacterial and fungal species involved in food poisoning and/or food decay. Roum Arch Microbiol Immunol. 2010 Oct-Dec;69(4):224-30.

  11. Soares BV, Morais SM, dos Santos Fontenelle RO, Queiroz VA, Vila-Nova NS, Pereira CM, Brito ES, Neto MA, Brito EH, Cavalcante CS, Castelo-Branco DS, Rocha MF. Antifungal activity, toxicity and chemical composition of the essential oil of Coriandrum sativum L. fruits. Molecules. 2012 Jul 11;17(7):8439-48. doi: 10.3390/molecules17078439.

 

 




 

 

 



Coriander Oil

...Could Tackle Food Poisoning and Drug-Resistant Infections
24 August 2011

from SGM Website

recovered through WayBackMachine Website
 

 


Coriander oil has been shown to be toxic to a broad range of harmful bacteria.

 

Its use in foods and in clinical agents could prevent food-borne illnesses and even treat antibiotic-resistant infections, according to the authors of a study published in the Journal of Medical Microbiology.

Researchers from the University of Beira Interior in Portugal tested coriander oil against 12 bacterial strains, including,

  • Escherichia coli

  • Salmonella enterica

  • Bacillus cereus

  • meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)

Of the tested strains, all showed reduced growth, and most were killed, by solutions containing 1.6% coriander oil or less.

Coriander is an aromatic plant widely used in Mediterranean cuisine.

 

Coriander oil is one of the 20 most-used essential oils in the world and is already used as a food additive. Coriander oil is produced from the seeds of the coriander plant and numerous health benefits have been associated with using this herb over the centuries.

 

These include,

  • pain relief

  • ease of cramps and convulsions

  • cure of nausea

  • aid of digestion

  • treatment of fungal infections

This study [Coriander (Coriandrum sativum L.) Essential Oil - Its Antibacterial Activity and Mode of Action Evaluated by Flow Cytometry] not only shows that coriander oil also has an antibacterial effect, but provides an explanation for how it works, which was not previously understood.

"The results indicate that coriander oil damages the membrane surrounding the bacterial cell.

 

This disrupts the barrier between the cell and its environment and inhibits essential processes including respiration, which ultimately leads to death of the bacterial cell," explained Dr Fernanda Domingues who led the study.

The researchers suggest that coriander oil could have important applications in the food and medical industries.

"In developed countries, up to 30% of the population suffers from food-borne illness each year. This research encourages the design of new food additives containing coriander oil that would combat food-borne pathogens and prevent bacterial spoilage," said Dr Domingues.

 

"Coriander oil could also become a natural alternative to common antibiotics. We envisage the use of coriander in clinical drugs in the form of lotions, mouth rinses and even pills; to fight multidrug-resistant bacterial infections that otherwise could not be treated. This would significantly improve peopleís quality of life."



 






 



Coriander Oil

-   Scientists Discover Natural Substance Fights Superbugs and Food Poisoning   -
by Sherry Baker
August 30, 2011

from NaturalNews Website

 

 

Mainstream medicine has lots of statistics about two types of serious and even deadly illnesses - food-borne diseases and antibiotic resistant infections, also known as superbugs - but not many ways to treat them successfully.

 

That may soon change, however, thanks to research by scientists from the University of Beira Interior in Portugal. A key to fighting these growing threats to world health appears to be a natural substance that contains powerful infection-fighting properties, coriander oil.

Just how serious are food-borne diseases?

 

The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) website notes they cause approximately 76 million illnesses, 325,000 hospitalizations, and 5,000 deaths in the United States each year. Antibiotic-resistant superbugs also cause life threatening infections in large numbers.

 

For example, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus Aureus (MRSA) is a type of staph bacteria resistant to many antibiotics and causes the deaths of about 19,000 Americans each year.

 

The CDC recently added another serious health threat to the list of superbugs, a bacterium dubbed NDM-1, and has declared it a communicable disease that is extremely hard to treat and may cause infections that kill.

That's the bad news.

 

But here's the good news: a new study from Portugal just published in the Journal of Medical Microbiology [Coriander (Coriandrum sativum L.) Essential Oil - Its Antibacterial Activity and Mode of Action Evaluated by Flow Cytometry] shows coriander oil can kill a broad range of harmful bacteria.

 

According to the research team, using the oil in foods and in clinical agents could prevent food-borne illnesses and even treat antibiotic-resistant infections.

The scientists tested coriander oil against 12 bacterial strains, including Escherichia coli, Salmonella enterica, Bacillus cereus and MRSA.

 

The results? In all of the tested strains of bacteria, the growth of the disease-causing germs was greatly reduced. In fact, most were killed when exposed to solutions containing 1.6% coriander oil or less.

The new study shows more than the fact coriander oil has an antibacterial effect. It also provides an explanation for how the natural substance works.

 

The results indicate that coriander oil damages the membrane surrounding the bacterial cell. In a press statement, Dr. Fernanda Domingues, who led the study, explained coriander oil disrupts the barrier between the cell and its environment and inhibits essential processes which ultimately lead to death of the bacterial cells.

The research suggestions that coriander oil could have important applications both in preventing food borne illnesses and in treating superbug infections.

"In developed countries, up to 30% of the population suffers from food-borne illness each year. This research encourages the design of new food additives containing coriander oil that would combat food-borne pathogens and prevent bacterial spoilage," Dr. Domingues stated.

 

"Coriander oil could also become a natural alternative to common antibiotics. We envisage the use of coriander in clinical drugs in the form of lotions, mouth rinses and even pills; to fight multidrug-resistant bacterial infections that otherwise could not be treated. This would significantly improve people's quality of life."

Coriander oil is one of the 20 most-used essential oils in the world and is already added to food in some cultures (for example, it is used as a seasoning in many Indian curries).

 

Practitioners of traditional medicine have used coriander, produced from the seeds of the coriander plant, for centuries to treat numerous health problems.

 

It has been used for,

  • pain relief

  • to ease cramps and convulsions

  • to aid digestion and relieve nausea

  • to treat fungal infections