by Ted Twietmeyer

2008

from Data4Science Website


If you have ever had a baby and were still a virgin, I’ll warn you now that some of the facts revealed in this report may be unsettling. However, data provided within may also be useful if you are suffering from some types of unexplained medical problems.

If you are an adult female, let your imagine run free for a minute.

 

Imagine being a virgin female and your menstruation did not begin as it should. Since you have not had sexual relations with man yet in your life, you suspect something is physically wrong. You make an appointment with your Gynecologist for an examination. During the examination the doctor develops a perplexed bewildered look upon his face. Then after he gets over what he sees, he delivers the impossible news – even though he can tell that you’re still a virgin, he tells you that you’re pregnant.

After you get over the complete shock of suddenly being a mother, you begin to wonder how this could even be possible.

 

Slowly your realize the numerous concerns that will now be a part of your life – your increase in stomach size, the questions, looks and remarks from friends, family and coworkers who know you’re pregnant but single, OB-GYN doctor appointments, less physical exertion in the near future, concerns about birth defects and what you’ll do if these occur - all this worry and expense for a baby that you shouldn’t be carrying in the first place.

 

And if you’re a model, you have an even bigger problem to deal with.

In this age of promiscuity, no one will believe that you became pregnant without intercourse. Even worse, your baby won’t have a father. And if you have a boyfriend now, you probably won’t see much more of him when he finds out. He’ll never believe you became pregnant without intercourse. Suddenly, you are flying solo in life and discover just how cruel this world is that we live in.

Yet as a virgin, to believe you’re pregnant still seems impossible. You have had a real-life immaculate conception, something considered impossible and supposedly only in the Bible.

Is all this fiction?

 

In reality, this horrific thing has happened to untold numbers of women.

 

And after a virgin mother carries her baby for a few months enduring all the difficulties of pregnancy, one morning she wakes up and experiences yet another shock - her baby is gone. She quickly returns to her doctor, who is now totally perplexed after confirming the news.

Nothing in medical school ever prepared him for this. No delivery, no miscarriage, just gone. Now he too, is on his own just like you were. If he tells anyone in the medical profession about what he has seen he’d be laughed right out of town.

Such is the suffering and experience of countless women worldwide, and it has probably been taking place for centuries, if not millennia. Imagine the agony of the mother in the past… such as in Victorian or Quaker times. It would be a sure ticket to be run out of town or shunned, for no one would ever believe the mother.

But science knows that biological issues with pregnancy do not stop after the baby is miscarried or delivered. The mother can carry fetal cells within her body for a very long time after delivery. In a recent Scientific American article research pertaining to the discovery of retaining fetal cells was presented. [1]

 

First, it is important to note that the text did NOT cover the migration of fetal cells from an alien baby insemination. I take sole responsibility for my theory here, based on the logic of what can take place based on current research.

For women who carry a different RH factor than the fetus has, they must receive an injection after a delivery or miscarriage. This prevents serious complications in the mother from mixing blood of two different blood types.

What takes place during pregnancy is something known as fetal or maternal microchimerism. This does not refer to red blood cell, but tissue cells. The placenta is not a barrier to cell transfer as once thought. Maternal microchimerism occurs when the mother’s cells enter the fetus and remain there.

With fetal microchimerism, cells from the fetus move through the placenta into the mother. Blood circulates freely in both the mother and the fetus through the placenta, and some of the fetal cells take up residence in various tissues of the mother. Today, this is receiving considerable research since it suggests it could contribute to both disease and health problems in the mother.

Research discovering this takes place dates back some sixty years. Other research dates back to 1893, when a German researcher found signs of such a transfer in the lungs of women who died from a hypertensive disorder of pregnancy. In 1979, L. Herzenberg of Stanford University found male cells in the blood of women who were pregnant with boys.

 

In the 1990s it was discovered,

“Small numbers of foreign cells survive indefinitely in healthy individuals.”

Note the word “foreign” used here, which could mean almost any type of cells.

Cells acquired by the mother can last for decades and can become part of the mother’s organs. It is currently believed that in some cases this can result in an autoimmune attack, but may also cause healing in other cases. Though not specifically stated in the article, this might be one of the causes of MS and other autoimmune disorders.

Microchimerism can also work the other way, when cells from the mother are present in the fetus. This is not the same as the fact that a baby grows in a mother’s womb, as these cells acquired by the fetus are different.

J. Lee Nelson who wrote the article states that colleagues found maternal cells in adults who had a normal immune system, including a person aged 46 (page 74.):

"Although most cells that transfer live for a limited time and die, stem cells are an exception. Stem cells can divide create a number of specialized cell types, such those constituting the immune system or the tissue of an organ. Long term cells were found to be stem cells or related descendants of stem cells in test subjects."

Current research shows the mother carries these cells in all the organs, except the brain which has not yet been confirmed. (I believe the presence of these cells in the brain and other organs in the head including the eye will be confirmed in the future. Blood circulates freely from the fetus there as well.)

 

Besides organs, fetal cells have also been found in skin, bone marrow, cervix, thyroid and even the salivary glands of mothers.

You probably have already made the connection between possible fetal microchimerism and alien inseminated pregnancy. For many women who have been inseminated (not all that different form the way farmers inseminate cattle) it doesn’t stop with one pregnancy. This nightmare can happen many times to the same woman, over and over again.

It’s so horrific for a single woman to go through this, that to the best of my knowledge no one has ever made a movie about how this can happen in real life. However, some years ago some of the victims of alien insemination appeared on a rare television documentary.

Some woman in the documentary said they considered suicide, and the documentary stated at least one actually did commit suicide after repeated pregnancies. Many women have moved thousands of miles in an attempt to stop the abductions which accomplished nothing to stop the problem. Many women are inseminated again after the current baby is taken from them during the night.

Clearly, there are beings on Earth and visiting Earth who have absolutely NO regard for human life as we do. Indeed, we are cattle to them.

The knowledge of this could be used to an advantage. For example, if alien cells could be collected a DNA test might be run on them. Such a test might actually show just what the alien baby could look like, telling us how much they do or do not look like us.

Another use for this knowledge of alien DNA is that it might be helpful to fight diseases of unknown origin. Often researchers simply need to know where to look to begin their work of isolating a pathogen or other problem. Samples of eradicated diseases are commonly kept in laboratories for study just for that purpose, to provide researchers with sufficient quantities of the pathogen for research.

From the Scientific American article we have learned that foreign cells present in mothers are easily collected for research. On that basis, a DNA test could also be run which might determine whether or not the cells are human…or alien.

The detailed work described by Dr. Nelson shows us this is a very complex issue still undergoing research.

 

This research is also drawing intense scrutiny from medical researchers. I know a world renowned vision scientist and have asked him if whether some eye diseases could be related to microchimerism in females. No answer on this has been received as of the date of this writing.

In an essay written by Dalya Rosner (a Cambridge University PhD student in 2004,) she makes a case for autoimmune disease problems associated with foreign cells in the body (see below insert):

“A number of studies have found a correlation between the presence of these cellular trespassers and a group of conditions known as autoimmune diseases in which the immune system appears to turn upon the bodies' own tissues. Usually one particular organ or tissue is targeted leading to diseases such as diabetes, which is caused by the destruction of insulin-producing cells in the pancreas, or rheumatoid arthritis, in which the immune system attacks our joints.”

She also describes the implications of foreign cells in the body:

“Under normal circumstances the immune system is programmed to live peacefully with cells from its own body and to destroy only foreign invaders such as germs or cells with the wrong DNA. Cells containing different DNA can arise through mutation, the mechanism which produces cancer, through organ transplantation, including bone marrow transplantation, or through microchimerism.

Such cells express a slightly altered pattern of chemical markers on their surfaces, helping the immune system to identify them as foreign and leading to the mounting of an immune attack which destroys them. “

 


The Microchimera Mixture
Autoimmune disease and chimeric cells
by Dalya Rosner

 June 2004

from TheNakedScientist Website

 
There are some very odd things that happen occasionally and are contrary to what we humans would like to believe is the natural order of things. One of the strangest notions I have come across in the biological world is the formation of microchimeras (pronounced 'micro-ky-meras'), meaning quite literally 'an animal with parts made from many animals'.

During pregnancy, cells can roam between bodies. Fetal cells can transplant themselves into the mother, maternal cells can be found in the fetus, and cells from twins can swap places with each other. This doesn't happen all the time, but it seems to happen sufficiently often to warrant investigation into the clinical significance of this very bizarre, "Frankenstein-ish" phenomenon.

So, is microchimerism a good thing or a bad thing?

 


Microchimeras and autoimmune diseases
Bad news first.

 

A number of studies have found a correlation between the presence of these cellular trespassers and a group of conditions known as autoimmune diseases in which the immune system appears to turn upon the bodies' own tissues. Usually one particular organ or tissue is targeted leading to diseases such as diabetes, which is caused by the destruction of insulin-producing cells in the pancreas, or rheumatoid arthritis, in which the immune system attacks our joints.

Under normal circumstances the immune system is programmed to live peacefully with cells from its own body and to destroy only foreign invaders such as germs or cells with the wrong DNA.

Cells containing different DNA can arise through mutation, the mechanism which produces cancer, through organ transplantation, including bone marrow transplantation, or through microchimerism. Such cells express a slightly altered pattern of chemical markers on their surfaces, helping the immune system to identify them as foreign and leading to the mounting of an immune attack which destroys them.

For reasons which we don't fully understand, occasionally the immune system mistakes our own healthy tissue for that of an invader and unleashes the full power of our defenses against our own body producing an autoimmune disease.

 

But recently scientists announced that they have found microchimeric cells in the diseased tissues of women with some types of autoimmunity, leading them to speculate that the immune system is actually working just as it should. Indeed, perhaps cells from a woman's child(ren), which have become lodged in the affected tissues, are the ones that are attacked rather than the mother's own cells, creating, in effect, cases of transplant rejection.

 

In the ensuing battle, our own healthy tissue, surrounding the trespassing cells, becomes damaged by 'friendly fire'.

 

The evidence is very tenuous at this point and is only one of many possible explanations for the etiology of certain types of autoimmune diseases, but it does offer one explanation for the observation that some of these diseases are commoner in women than men, and are related to pregnancy.

 

Potential benefits of microchimerism
Luckily it's not all bad news because there can be positive aspects to microchimerism too. Many maternal immune systems are quite happy to tolerate their offsprings' cells (practice perhaps for tolerating their whining?).

 

In cases of a microchimeric mother requiring a transplant from a child that wouldn't otherwise be a good match, there is evidence for improved transplant acceptance rates. Perhaps the immune system has been tricked through years of harboring the child's cells (containing alien DNA) into thinking that the new organ is a naturally-occurring part of the body ?

From this we learn that microchimerism can be good or bad, though perhaps most times it won't make any difference at all.

 

However, it brings us to an important consideration of what we are made of. Our environment has long been known to play a significant part in our development as people. Perhaps more crucial is the interaction between our genes and the environment in which we live. Whether that be how close we live to a pylon, or how dysfunctional our families are, the net result impacts greatly upon our future health.

At one time scientists believed that two people with the same DNA (e.g. identical twins) possessed the same genetic potential, even if they were living in different environments. Microchimerism, however, casts doubt on these traditional views.

 

Despite everything we learned in A level biology, it seems that not every cell in our body must arise from that crucial moment of conception and that one part of our body may have a genetic inheritance arising, at least in part, from another human being. If many of us are chimeras, it puts a new twist on the cloning issue - copying DNA from one cell would not yield a replica of the cloned individual even if they were somehow nurtured in identical environments.

 

Humans, and the intrigues of the biological world, are much more complex than that.

 

Here’s a simple translation of the above:

Normally, the only cells in the body attacked by the immune system are those that shouldn’t be present. But normal cells can be misidentified by the immune system and attacked due to the presence of foreign cells, which can lead to autoimmune disorders. Arthritis, MS and other autoimmune diseases are in this category.

Dalya Rosner continues:

“At one time scientists believed that two people with the same DNA (e.g. identical twins) possessed the same genetic potential, even if they were living in different environments. Microchimerism however, casts doubt on these traditional views.”

In conclusion, there exists sufficient evidence from today’s biological research which shows the negative effect of foreign cells in the body. Foreign cells in mothers that have originated from the fetus could logically have earthly or alien origin.

Naturally not every mother will experience negative effects from the presence foreign cells, but clearly some do. Negative effects from foreign DNA may take years to appear, and it isn’t clearly understood at this time.

 

It is probably the health of the mother’s immune system and her genetics that determines whether or not autoimmune problems will develop sooner or later in life.

 

 

References

[1] – Scientific American magazine, print version February 2008