by Susanne Posel
June 26, 2012

from OccupyCorporatism Website





Governments and private sector corporations have pledged to fund the United Nations’ endeavors toward global governance with a generous $513 billion for Agenda 21 project that will restrict the movements of humans, perverse biodiversity and assist the UN in attaining their Millennium Development Goals.

Secretary-General Sha Zukang of the UN Conference on Sustainable Development (UNCSD) said that over 692 monetary promises were given to the UN.

UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon was thrilled that so much money had been given to the UN.

“These huge numbers give a sense of the scale and growth of investment going into sustainable development. They are part of a growing global movement for change. Our job now is to create a critical mass, an irresistible momentum.”

Corporations like PepsiCo, and Virgin’s CEO Richard Branson project Carbon War Room are receiving $2 billion from the US government.

Jose-Angel Gurria, secretary-general of the Organization for Economic Cooperation & Development, explained:

“Without the private sector it’s not going to work. While governments put up the seed money, the big numbers come from the private sector. The private sector is looking at green growth with great interest, seeing it as an opportunity, as jobs, as investment.”

Academia and universities in places like Bejing, Sydney, Paris and New York will conduct and fund Agenda 21 projects on mega-city sustainability. Most of the $1 trillion allotted will go to projects in turbine, solar, biofuel and geothermal energy.

Manish Bapna, acting president of the World Resources Institute (WRI), a Washington-based environmental research group, said:

“There’s no doubt that Rio+20 fell short. But it’s a mistake to conflate what happened here with what’s happening on the ground. You just need to look beyond the walls of the conference to find real-world examples of action.”

The Natural Resources Defense Council will target specific commitments concerning environmental advocacy that is intended to coerce the public into making the much needed rally cry for the new sustainable changes to our lives that the global Elite want to implement.

Bjorn Lomborg, professor at Copenhagen Business School, admonishes the follow-through records of governments as “very poor” and says they should be made to follow the recommendations set out at the conference in Rio.


Lomborg explains that the UN has turned to corporations to help them.

Hillary Clinton, US Secretary of State supports the incorporation of the Agenda 21 movement.


She remarked that,

“sustainability won’t happen without business investment. Governments alone cannot solve all the problems we face, from climate change to persistent poverty to chronic energy shortages. That’s why we are so strongly in favor of partnerships.”

As far as UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon is concerned, the money from corporations and governments cannot come at a better time.


Ki-moon claims that “words must translate into action” with regard to moving the environmental governance agenda forward.

Ki-moon says that since the first UNCSD, the incremental slide toward total global governance has spawned UN conventions on climate change, biodiversity and desertification, as well as the Agenda 21 blueprint for sustainable development, yet,

“progress has been too slow - we have not gone far enough down the road. We are now in sight of a historic agreement - the world is waiting to see if words will translate into action, as we know they must.”

The Asian Development Bank, one of 8 international development financial institutions have agreed to give the UN $175 billion for sustainable transportation schemes to be built and running within 10 years.

Holger Dalkmann, of the WRI, believe that greenhouse gas emissions must be drastically cut by the controlled utilization of sustainable transport to replace private cars to ensure,

“cleaner air, less congested roads, and safer transportation.”

Businesses must be balancing costs with sustainability in order to continue doing business.


Nick Clegg, UK Deputy Prime Minister calls this practice “a false economy” and demands transparency from British corporations.

Gro Harlem Brundtland, says that corporate power must be merged with the UN’s sustainable development goals if they are to be successful.

Governments like Russia, the Middle Eastern Nations and Latin America have been ruled as opposing the UN’s Agenda 21 policies.

Redirecting cash flow toward under-developed nations in a huge money laundering scheme is what the UN are planning. Endorsing green economies as defined by the UN’s standards are being forced upon South African nations right now.

Jeffrey Sachs, professor at Columbia University and special adviser to UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon strongly suggests that:

“Those of us who look at this day in, day out know that many poor countries need that kind of help. And it does not do any good to cite large ambitious promises many years out, and then behind the scenes to say ‘we’re not going to talk about how they’re going to be fulfilled.”

Lisa Jackson, administrator for the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) affirmed that the US is committed to the UN’s Agenda 21 and the “green economy” that is required to sustain the scheme.

Brundtland explains that governments should work more closely with the powerful corporations to synergize,

“our political system, corporations, businesses and people who have economic power influence political decision-makers - that’s a fact, and so it’s part of the analysis.”

The UN is currently fine-tuning their UN climate agreement that will be ushered in at the “next Copenhagen” conference.


It is there that the world will see the unveiling of legal force, corporate influence and the march toward global governance called "Agenda 21."