by David Astle

1975

from JRBooksOnLine Website

 

 

A Study of The Origin of Certain Banking Practices, and of their effect on the events of Ancient History, written in the light of the Present Day.

 


 

David Astle's "The Babylonian Woe" is the finest book on the
history of money in antiquity that I've ever read. In this scholarly
work, he has presented to the world a history of the effects of
monetary mechanics in very ancient times.

 

It illustrates how, even in
the earliest times of which written record remains, the days of
Babylonia or before, a so-called monetary science undoubtedly existed;
being then, as in today, never more than as instrument by which its
secret and cynical controllers wittingly influenced the destinies of
individuals, nations, and empires as to (temporary) glory or final
disaster.

 
This important and well-documented work is a most useful reference
book; complementing any study of Economic or Monetary history. It will
be a great asset to learned societies, top management, and self-
teaching individuals in all parts of the world.



The intellectual faculties however are not of themselves sufficient to produce external action; they require the aid of physical force, the direction and combination of which are wholly at the disposal of money, that mighty spring by which the total force of human energies is set in motion.

 

Contents

  1. In The Beginning Was The Word

  2. The Temple And The Counting House

  3. Per Me Dei Regnant!

  4. The Left Hand of Dawn

  5. Blood, Sorrow, And Silver

  6. Babylon, Banking, And Bullion

  7. Phrygia, Finance, And Front Man

  8. Tyrant And Trapezitae

  9. Potsherds And Other Fragments

  10. Pergamum And Pitane

  11. Voices From The Dust

  12. Sparta, The Pelanors, Wealth, And Women

  13. Money Creators And The Political Control

  14. Man Proposes But God Disposes

Return to Temas / Sociopolitica

Return to Temas / Libros-Tratados

Return to Sumer and The Anunnaki

Return to The Global Banking System